City Park Junior Entrepreneur Day and Community Garage Sale

This weekend, on Saturday June 23 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., City Park is hosting a junior entrepreneur day and community garage sale.

Throughout the neighbourhood, young City Parkers are encouraged to set up lemonade stands, homemade jewellery stands, cookie and cupcake tables and face-painting booths, among any other ideas that may spark up.

The junior entrepreneur day will coincide with a neighbourhood-wide garage sale. The goal is for children to have fun and for neighbours to enjoy a morning market.

Everyone in the neighbourhood is open to participate. For more information, contact Alana Berg at alanabsp@gmail.com, or Tammy Zdunich at tammy@boehmerphotography.com.

Advertisements

Residential parking permits about to expire

The City of Saskatoon is reminding City Park residents who live in the residential parking permit zone, near City Hospital, that their parking permits expire April 30.

The new permits are available at city hall and must be displayed by May 10.

The City Park residential parking permits allows residents who live in the permit zone to park longer than the posted time limit. Proof of residency must be provided when purchased.

Two-hour time restriction signs are posted in a large area surrounding City Hospital and are in effect 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday.

Vehicles without a permit that are parked longer than the posted limit will be subject to a ticket.

Check out the city’s website for more information.

The shaded area below shows the City Park parking permit zone.

Jane’s Walk fosters community pride

By Dwayne Keir, Member-at-Large

As the old adage goes: “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts?”

But what does that actually mean? How does this concept work in the real world?

Both of these questions can be answered when trying to understand what builds, maintains and sustains a community.

The work of Jane Jacobs centered on creating concepts and systems that will better understand these type of questions, while seeking to achieve better answers to them as well.

Humans obviously prefer, as a minimal standard, a living arrangement that is safe, healthy, enjoyable, affordable, clean, and accessible.

What makes the concept of “a community” complex is that each person will have a unique perspective of what this type living arrangement consists of.

Since 2007, on the first weekend of May walking events have been organized around the globe in honor of Jane Jacobs and her work.

The walks are local, diverse, and most importantly, informally planned so that they simply frame discussions about the community in which they occur.

A walk can be as simple as moving between and discussing the favourite gathering places in a neighbourhood and why people gather there.

These types of shared experiences are the roots of self organizing systems which build and grow vibrant communities.

Basically, there are no rules for the walks, the only goal is to understand and enhance our community through sharing reflections of where and how we live.

If anyone is interested in coming out, or organizing a walk, please feel free to send a quick message to any of the Jane’s Walk contacts, or post your own walk on the website below.

http://www.janeswalk.net/cities/landing/category/saskatoon/

Gord Androsoff
gandrosoff@sasktell.net
Cell: 306-371-8108

Tom Wolf
tom.wolf@sasktel.net
Cell: 306-716-2490

Dwayne Keir
keir.dwayne@gmail.com
Cell: 306-717-2807

Photo: Alexandra Guerson/Flickr

City food bank freshens things up with urban garden challenge

The Saskatoon Food Bank is issuing a challenge to businesses, community groups and citizens to take over a plot of the downtown vegetable patch and tend it for the upcoming gardening season.

Over the past two summers, the 900 block of Third Avenue North, in City Park, has gone from a chalky run-down vacant lot to a vast well-kept vegetable patch, with the help of a core group of food bank volunteers and area residents. To date, the garden has produced 12,700 kilograms of fresh vegetables for food bank hampers.

This year, organizers are hoping teams from within the community are willing to join them and in getting their hands dirty and help contribute to the harvest.

“Hopefully, it’ll inspire groups to get involved in urban agriculture, generate some excitement and create some friendly competition,” said Jasmin Fookes, the food bank’s urban agriculture coordinator, to the StarPhoenix.

She said the challenge will run right from planting to harvesting, so it will keep teams busy and interested throughout the growing season.

The rare strip of downtown garden, which has been mostly potatoes and corn in recent years, will be expanding to other varieties of vegetables with a focus on companion crops, Fookes told the Starphoenix.

The food bank gets thousands of requests each month for emergency food and relies on donations and the garden patch to keep its shelves stocked, especially during the summer months.

“It allows us to provide fresh produce throughout the growing season,” she said.

Fookes said that with over 20 community gardens and the popularity of the Saskatoon Farmers’ Market, the city is becoming more interested in fresh, locally-grown food.

“There’s a lot of vacant land in the city and the patch is the first initiative of its kind in Saskatoon,” she told the StarPhoenix. “Hopefully it inspires others to take on their own urban agriculture projects.”

The City Park Community Garden — located in Wilson Park — received a high volume of applications this year, and has assigned a full slate of plots. Gardening season should kick off in the coming weeks.

Photo: John Pozadzides/Flickr

SP story by Jeremy Warren

The Next Big Thing: Seventh Avenue Gateway

The City Park Community Association voted last month to spend extra funds on new projects in the community, including renewing the neighbourhood entrance at the Seventh Avenue and 33rd Street railway crossing.

Now, a steering committee has been formed to oversee the capital expenditure. Some early suggestions include hiring a local youth art group to mural the cement walls of the overpass and also to clean up the surrounding area. Canadian Pacific Railway has been contacted, and they too have shown interest in providing some financial support for the project.

The project was chosen from an official list of ideas from City Park residents, compiled by members of the CPCA for The Next Big Thing venture. Other suggestions included planting an apple orchard in Wilson Park, which could potentially be the first step to a full-fledged food forest. Also, some residents pitched the idea for a picnic structure in Wilson Park, equipped with an outdoor wood-burning oven.

However, according to the majority of the members of the CPCA at the February executive meeting, renewing the Seventh Avenue Gateway is top priority. Currently, the area surrounding the train overpass appears industrial and uninviting, says council members.

The cost of improving The Seventh Avenue Gateway is still unknown, but its possible there will be funds left over in The Next Big Thing portfolio for additional projects.

Going into 2012, the CPCA had accumulated a substantial surplus, therefore allowing the organization to tackle a major project. The earmarked money will still leave an appropriate operating budget for the remander of the year.

Anyone with comments or suggestions regarding The Next Big Thing project is asked to email CPCA Vice President Janice Braden at janicelbraden@gmail.com.

Photo: Google Street View

33rd Street project great for cyclists

Biking is about to become easier and safer for residents of City Park.

City council has approved the construction of a multi-use cyclist and pedestrian corridor along the south side of 33rd street. The pathway will stretch from Spadina Crescent to 3rd Avenue, directly along the border of City Park and North Park.

The new three-metre-wide separated avenue is the first phase of a $6.7 million masterplan, which will eventually connect the University of Saskatchewan main campus with the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST).

According to a city report, the first phase — which will also be available to those in wheelchairs and scooters — will cost $1.67 million, with $1 million coming from the federal government.

The rest of the project ,which is yet to be funded, will include the continuation of the 33rd Street corridor, from 3rd Avenue to Idylwyld Drive, and additionally, a roundabout at Spadina Crescent and 33rd street, improved streetlights, landscaping, new benches and bus stops.

The planned corridor is one of a handful of attempts the city has recently made to improve bicycle safety, showing they are finally on-board to resolve the poor conditions cyclists face in Saskatoon.

In 2011, the city released a comprehensive how-to guide to cycling in Saskatoon. According to the city’s website, the guide “rates every road in Saskatoon, from novice to intermediate and expert, and provides suggested routes and facilities that have been identified by experienced local cyclists and City staff.”

The guides are free, and can be downloaded on PDF here, or you can pick up a hard copy from any library or leisure centre.

On the website you can also check out the city’s cycling newsletter, read about bicycle safety and research Saskatoon’s overall “plan for cycling.”

Graphic: City of Saskatoon

Press Release: Demolition of Bethany / Silverwood House

SASKATOON (February 14, 2012): The City Park Community Association (CPCA) deeply regrets the imminent demolition of the Bethany Home on Queen Street. The destruction of this historic character building will be a loss not just to City Park but also to the people of Saskatoon as very few such 100-year old residences remain in our city.

We appreciate that the new owner and developer of the site offered the house to the city and attempted to have it moved off the lot so as to preserve the building. We feel however that more houses such as the Bethany Home should be designated as heritage buildings. The City of Saskatoon also needs to provide more protection for our historic buildings that are currently not designated as heritage, including putting in place an extensive consultation process with the neighbourhood affected before a demolition permit is granted.

For more information contact CPCA President Michael Murphy at 244-5267 or vice-president Janice Braden at 321-2310.

Photo: Saskatoonhomepage.ca